WEIRDMUL - Editorial

PROBLEM LINK:

Contest Link

Author: Shahjalal Shohag
Tester: Encho Misev
Editorialist: Rajarshi Basu

DIFFICULTY:

Medium-Hard

PREREQUISITES:

Math, Polynomials

PROBLEM:

You are given a sequence A_1, A_2, \ldots, A_N and an integer X. The weirdness of a contiguous subsequence A_l, A_{l+1}, \ldots, A_r is defined as W(l, r) = \sum_{i=l}^r A_i \cdot X^{i-l}. Find P = \prod_{i=1}^N \prod_{j=i}^N W(i, j)^2 modulo 998,244,353.

EXPLANATION:

NOTE: For a quick Explanation, check from hint 9 onwards.
What does not seem to work

This seems like a very polynomial-ish question, so maybe we could have tried to do some deductions thinking that we can get a nice equation in terms of X and the coefficients A_1,A_2,A_3 \dots A_n. Turns out, that is hard to do. Our usual techniques with modelling this directly as generating functions also seem to not work. Note that although it seems very similar to differences of formal power series, here we are actually putting a value of X so radius of convergence does become an issue.

If anyone solved it with the above-mentioned techniques, do comment below.

Hint 1

Since we are already given the value of X, let’s try to utilise that. Also, notice that the terms of the products are in the form of a “subarray-sum” somewhat. Any ideas?

Hint 2

Let p_k = \sum\limits_{i = 1}^{k}{A_i \cdot X^i} and p_0 = 0. Then we essentially have to find {P(X)}^2 where

  • P(x) = \prod\limits_{i = 0}^{n} \prod\limits_{j=i+1}^{n} {p_j - p_i \over x^{(i+1)} }
Hint 3

Let’s focus on calculating the numerator. Calculating the denominator is easy, and can be done by simply finding sum formula of the inner loop, and iterating over all i's in the outer loop.

Hint 4

Note that our expression for P(x) is a bit “mathematically weird” to calculate because of our need to calculate ordered pairs only.

Some more Ranting and intuition?

This means that we cannot make a generic equation for some j and take product over all j since we also have to take care that we ignore the elements before j. Hence, we cannot treat it as a ‘set’ of values, per se, but have to rather treat it as a sequence.

Hint 5

If we can find the numerator of P(x) as something nice, then why the need to square it? That seems like a bit irrelevant at this point unless you notice that calculating the square is actually very good for us since it allows us to calculate unordered pairs. Think!

Hint 6

Calculating the numerator of {P(x)}^2 can be seen as

  • \prod\limits_{j \neq i, 0 \leq j,i \leq n}{|p_j-p_i|}.
  • Here, the term p_j - p_i does appear exactly twice, once as p_j - p_i and once as p_i - p_j. Hence, to maintain the sign, we take the modulus sign.
  • Notice that we are counting unordered pairs now, hence i and j are “more” independent of each other.
Hint 7

The modulus sign is also weird. We can just ignore it. Notice that this implies that we need to fix the sign later on.

Hint 8

Let us write the numerator for {P(x)}^2 as following:

  • \prod\limits_{i}\prod\limits_{j, j \neq i}{(p_j-p_i)}
  • The inner product is almost free of i. Can that be useful?
Hint 9
  • Let A(p_i) = \prod\limits_{j \neq i}{(p_i-p_j)}
  • Then essentially we want to calculate \prod\limits_{i}{A(p_i)}
  • try to calculate A(p_i) for all values of p_i quickly!
Hint Level : ooof Size

Try to calculate A(p_i) using point evaluation on some polynomial maybe? I mean, if you can find a polynomial for A(x), then finding all A(p_i) can be done by multipoint evaluation. That is standard.

Hint Level : Megamind

Let us consider the following polynomial:

  • F(x) = \prod\limits_{i=0}^{n}{(x - p_i)}
  • Can you relate this somehow to A(p_i) ?

Biggest Brain Moment

Differentiate F(x) !!

All Details

Upon differentiation,

  • F'(x) = \sum\limits_{i=0}^{n}\prod\limits_{j \neq i}{(x-p_i)}
  • F'(p_i) = A(p_i)
  • Thus, we can compute F'(x) by differentiating F(x), and then perform multipoint evaluation to find all values of F'(p_i) which are exactly the values A(p_i)'s that we needed.

Final Detailings
  • Notice that in our calculations in unordered pairs, we let go of the modulus symbol. That means our sign might have been messed up. To fix, we just need to check whether the number of subarrays are even or odd. If it’s odd, multiply by -1, else we are done.
  • To calculate the denominator, express \prod\limits_{j = i+1}^{n}{X^{(i+1)}} as a single exponentiation in terms of i. Then, iterate over i and take product.
Time complexity

Overall, O(nlog^2n).

LINKS TO READ:

Link 1
Link 2
Link 3

SOLUTIONS:

Setter's Code
#include<bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
 
const int N = 1e5 + 9, mod = 998244353;
 
struct base {
    double x, y;
    base() { x = y = 0; }
    base(double x, double y): x(x), y(y) { }
};
inline base operator + (base a, base b) { return base(a.x + b.x, a.y + b.y); }
inline base operator - (base a, base b) { return base(a.x - b.x, a.y - b.y); }
inline base operator * (base a, base b) { return base(a.x * b.x - a.y * b.y, a.x * b.y + a.y * b.x); }
inline base conj(base a) { return base(a.x, -a.y); }
int lim = 1;
vector<base> roots = {{0, 0}, {1, 0}};
vector<int> rev = {0, 1};
const double PI = acosl(- 1.0);
void ensure_base(int p) {
    if(p <= lim) return;
    rev.resize(1 << p);
    for(int i = 0; i < (1 << p); i++) rev[i] = (rev[i >> 1] >> 1) + ((i & 1)  <<  (p - 1));
    roots.resize(1 << p);
    while(lim < p) {
        double angle = 2 * PI / (1 << (lim + 1));
        for(int i = 1 << (lim - 1); i < (1 << lim); i++) {
            roots[i << 1] = roots[i];
            double angle_i = angle * (2 * i + 1 - (1 << lim));
            roots[(i << 1) + 1] = base(cos(angle_i), sin(angle_i));
        }
        lim++;
    }
}
void fft(vector<base> &a, int n = -1) {
    if(n == -1) n = a.size();
    assert((n & (n - 1)) == 0);
    int zeros = __builtin_ctz(n);
    ensure_base(zeros);
    int shift = lim - zeros;
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) if(i < (rev[i] >> shift)) swap(a[i], a[rev[i] >> shift]);
    for(int k = 1; k < n; k <<= 1) {
        for(int i = 0; i < n; i += 2 * k) {
            for(int j = 0; j < k; j++) {
                base z = a[i + j + k] * roots[j + k];
                a[i + j + k] = a[i + j] - z;
                a[i + j] = a[i + j] + z;
            }
        }
    }
}
//eq = 0: 4 FFTs in total
//eq = 1: 3 FFTs in total
vector<int> multiply(vector<int> &a, vector<int> &b, int eq = 0) {
    int need = a.size() + b.size() - 1;
    int p = 0;
    while((1 << p) < need) p++;
    ensure_base(p);
    int sz = 1 << p;
    vector<base> A, B;
    if(sz > (int)A.size()) A.resize(sz);
    for(int i = 0; i < (int)a.size(); i++) {
        int x = (a[i] % mod + mod) % mod;
        A[i] = base(x & ((1 << 15) - 1), x >> 15);
    }
    fill(A.begin() + a.size(), A.begin() + sz, base{0, 0});
    fft(A, sz);
    if(sz > (int)B.size()) B.resize(sz);
    if(eq) copy(A.begin(), A.begin() + sz, B.begin());
    else {
        for(int i = 0; i < (int)b.size(); i++) {
            int x = (b[i] % mod + mod) % mod;
            B[i] = base(x & ((1 << 15) - 1), x >> 15);
        }
        fill(B.begin() + b.size(), B.begin() + sz, base{0, 0});
        fft(B, sz);
    }
    double ratio = 0.25 / sz;
    base r2(0,  - 1), r3(ratio, 0), r4(0,  - ratio), r5(0, 1);
    for(int i = 0; i <= (sz >> 1); i++) {
        int j = (sz - i) & (sz - 1);
        base a1 = (A[i] + conj(A[j])), a2 = (A[i] - conj(A[j])) * r2;
        base b1 = (B[i] + conj(B[j])) * r3, b2 = (B[i] - conj(B[j])) * r4;
        if(i != j) {
            base c1 = (A[j] + conj(A[i])), c2 = (A[j] - conj(A[i])) * r2;
            base d1 = (B[j] + conj(B[i])) * r3, d2 = (B[j] - conj(B[i])) * r4;
            A[i] = c1 * d1 + c2 * d2 * r5;
            B[i] = c1 * d2 + c2 * d1;
        }
        A[j] = a1 * b1 + a2 * b2 * r5;
        B[j] = a1 * b2 + a2 * b1;
    }
    fft(A, sz); fft(B, sz);
    vector<int> res(need);
    for(int i = 0; i < need; i++) {
        long long aa = A[i].x + 0.5;
        long long bb = B[i].x + 0.5;
        long long cc = A[i].y + 0.5;
        res[i] = (aa + ((bb % mod) << 15) + ((cc % mod) << 30))%mod;
    }
    return res;
}
template <int32_t MOD>
struct modint {
    int32_t value;
    modint() = default;
    modint(int32_t value_) : value(value_) {}
    inline modint<MOD> operator + (modint<MOD> other) const { int32_t c = this->value + other.value; return modint<MOD>(c >= MOD ? c - MOD : c); }
    inline modint<MOD> operator - (modint<MOD> other) const { int32_t c = this->value - other.value; return modint<MOD>(c <    0 ? c + MOD : c); }
    inline modint<MOD> operator * (modint<MOD> other) const { int32_t c = (int64_t)this->value * other.value % MOD; return modint<MOD>(c < 0 ? c + MOD : c); }
    inline modint<MOD> & operator += (modint<MOD> other) { this->value += other.value; if (this->value >= MOD) this->value -= MOD; return *this; }
    inline modint<MOD> & operator -= (modint<MOD> other) { this->value -= other.value; if (this->value <    0) this->value += MOD; return *this; }
    inline modint<MOD> & operator *= (modint<MOD> other) { this->value = (int64_t)this->value * other.value % MOD; if (this->value < 0) this->value += MOD; return *this; }
    inline modint<MOD> operator - () const { return modint<MOD>(this->value ? MOD - this->value : 0); }
    modint<MOD> pow(uint64_t k) const {
        modint<MOD> x = *this, y = 1;
        for (; k; k >>= 1) {
            if (k & 1) y *= x;
            x *= x;
        }
        return y;
    }
    modint<MOD> inv() const { return pow(MOD - 2); }  // MOD must be a prime
    inline modint<MOD> operator /  (modint<MOD> other) const { return *this *  other.inv(); }
    inline modint<MOD> operator /= (modint<MOD> other)       { return *this *= other.inv(); }
    inline bool operator == (modint<MOD> other) const { return value == other.value; }
    inline bool operator != (modint<MOD> other) const { return value != other.value; }
    inline bool operator < (modint<MOD> other) const { return value < other.value; }
    inline bool operator > (modint<MOD> other) const { return value > other.value; }
};
template <int32_t MOD> modint<MOD> operator * (int64_t value, modint<MOD> n) { return modint<MOD>(value) * n; }
template <int32_t MOD> modint<MOD> operator * (int32_t value, modint<MOD> n) { return modint<MOD>(value % MOD) * n; }
template <int32_t MOD> ostream & operator << (ostream & out, modint<MOD> n) { return out << n.value; }
 
using mint = modint<mod>;
struct poly {
    vector<mint> a;
    inline void normalize() {
        while((int)a.size() && a.back() == 0) a.pop_back();
    }
    template<class...Args> poly(Args...args): a(args...) { }
    poly(const initializer_list<mint> &x): a(x.begin(), x.end()) { }
    int size() const { return (int)a.size(); }
    inline mint coef(const int i) const { return (i < a.size() && i >= 0) ? a[i]: mint(0); }
	mint operator[](const int i) const { return (i < a.size() && i >= 0) ? a[i]: mint(0); } //Beware!! p[i] = k won't change the value of p.a[i]
	bool is_zero() const {
		for (int i = 0; i < size(); i++) if (a[i] != 0) return 0;
		return 1;
	}   
	poly operator + (const poly &x) const {
        int n = max(size(), x.size());
        vector<mint> ans(n);
        for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) ans[i] = coef(i) + x.coef(i);
        while ((int)ans.size() && ans.back() == 0) ans.pop_back();
        return ans;
    }
    poly operator - (const poly &x) const {
        int n = max(size(), x.size());
        vector<mint> ans(n);
        for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) ans[i] = coef(i) - x.coef(i);
        while ((int)ans.size() && ans.back() == 0) ans.pop_back();
        return ans;
    }
    poly operator * (const poly& b) const {
        if(is_zero() || b.is_zero()) return {};
        vector<int> A, B;
	    for(auto x: a) A.push_back(x.value);
	    for(auto x: b.a) B.push_back(x.value);
	    auto res = multiply(A, B, (A == B));
	    vector<mint> ans;
	    for(auto x: res) ans.push_back(mint(x));
	    while ((int)ans.size() && ans.back() == 0) ans.pop_back();
	    return ans;
    }
    poly operator * (const mint& x) const {
        int n = size();
        vector<mint> ans(n);
        for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) ans[i] = a[i] * x;
        return ans;
    }
    poly operator / (const mint &x) const{ return (*this) * x.inv(); }
    poly& operator += (const poly &x) { return *this = (*this) + x; }
    poly& operator -= (const poly &x) { return *this = (*this) - x; }
    poly& operator *= (const poly &x) { return *this = (*this) * x; }
    poly& operator *= (const mint &x) { return *this = (*this) * x; }
    poly& operator /= (const mint &x) { return *this = (*this) / x; }
    poly mod_xk(int k) const { return {a.begin(), a.begin() + min(k, size())}; } //modulo by x^k
    poly mul_xk(int k) const { // multiply by x^k
		poly ans(*this);
		ans.a.insert(ans.a.begin(), k, 0);
		return ans;
	}
	poly div_xk(int k) const { // divide by x^k
		return vector<mint>(a.begin() + min(k, (int)a.size()), a.end());
	}
	poly substr(int l, int r) const { // return mod_xk(r).div_xk(l)
		l = min(l, size());
		r = min(r, size());
		return vector<mint>(a.begin() + l, a.begin() + r);
	}
	poly reverse_it(int n, bool rev = 0) const { // reverses and leaves only n terms
		poly ans(*this);
		if(rev) { // if rev = 1 then tail goes to head
			ans.a.resize(max(n, (int)ans.a.size()));
		}
		reverse(ans.a.begin(), ans.a.end());
		return ans.mod_xk(n);
	}
    poly differentiate() const {
        int n = size(); vector<mint> ans(n);
        for(int i = 1; i < size(); i++) ans[i - 1] = coef(i) * i;
        return ans;
    }
  	poly inverse(int n) const {  // 1 / p(x) % x^n, O(nlogn)
        assert(!is_zero()); assert(a[0] != 0);
        poly ans{mint(1) / a[0]};
        for(int i = 1; i < n; i *= 2) {
            ans = (ans * mint(2) - ans * ans * mod_xk(2 * i)).mod_xk(2 * i);
        }
        return ans.mod_xk(n);
    }
	pair<poly, poly> divmod_slow(const poly &b) const { // when divisor or quotient is small
		vector<mint> A(a);
		vector<mint> ans;
		while(A.size() >= b.a.size()) {
			ans.push_back(A.back() / b.a.back());
			if(ans.back() != mint(0)) {
				for(size_t i = 0; i < b.a.size(); i++) {
					A[A.size() - i - 1] -= ans.back() * b.a[b.a.size() - i - 1];
				}
			}
			A.pop_back();
		}
		reverse(ans.begin(), ans.end());
		return {ans, A};
	}
	pair<poly, poly> divmod(const poly &b) const { // returns quotient and remainder of a mod b
		if(size() < b.size()) return {poly{0}, *this};
		int d = size() - b.size();
		if(min(d, b.size()) < 250) return divmod_slow(b);
		poly D = (reverse_it(d + 1) * b.reverse_it(d + 1).inverse(d + 1)).mod_xk(d + 1).reverse_it(d + 1, 1);
		return {D, *this - (D * b)};
	}
	poly operator / (const poly &t) const {return divmod(t).first;}
	poly operator % (const poly &t) const {return divmod(t).second;}
	poly& operator /= (const poly &t) {return *this = divmod(t).first;}
	poly& operator %= (const poly &t) {return *this = divmod(t).second;}
	mint eval(mint x) { // evaluates in single point x
		mint ans(0);
		for(int i = (int)size() - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
			ans *= x;
			ans += a[i];
		}
		return ans;
	}
	poly build(vector<poly> &ans, int v, int l, int r, vector<mint> &vec) { //builds evaluation tree for (x-a1)(x-a2)...(x-an)
		if(l == r) return ans[v] = poly({-vec[l], 1});
		int mid = l + r >> 1;
		return ans[v] = build(ans, 2 * v, l, mid, vec) * build(ans, 2 * v + 1, mid + 1, r, vec);
	}
	vector<mint> eval(vector<poly> &tree, int v, int l, int r, vector<mint> &vec) { // auxiliary evaluation function
		if(l == r) return {eval(vec[l])};
		if (size() < 100) {
			vector<mint> ans(r - l + 1, 0);
			for (int i = l; i <= r; i++) ans[i - l] = eval(vec[i]);
			return ans; 
		}
		int mid = l + r >> 1;
		auto A = (*this % tree[2 * v]).eval(tree, 2 * v, l, mid, vec);
		auto B = (*this % tree[2 * v + 1]).eval(tree, 2 * v + 1, mid + 1, r, vec);
		A.insert(A.end(), B.begin(), B.end());
		return A;
	}
	//O(nlog^2n)
	vector<mint> eval(vector<mint> x) {// evaluate polynomial in (x_0, ..., x_n-1)
		int n = x.size();
		if(is_zero()) return vector<mint>(n, mint(0));
		vector<poly> tree(4 * n);
		build(tree, 1, 0, n - 1, x);
		return eval(tree, 1, 0, n - 1, x);
	}
};
poly mul(int l, int r, vector<mint> &a) {
	if (l == r) return poly({-a[l], 1});
	int mid = l + r >> 1;
	return mul(l, mid, a) * mul(mid + 1, r, a);
}
int32_t main() {
	ios_base::sync_with_stdio(0);
	cin.tie(0);
	int t; cin >> t;
    assert(1 <= t && t <= 100000);
    int sum = 0;
	while (t--) {
		int n, x; cin >> n >> x;
        assert(1 <= n && n <= 100000);
        assert(0 <= x && x < mod);
        sum += n;
		vector<mint> a(n + 1, 0);
		for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
			int k; cin >> k;
            assert(0 <= k && k < mod);
			a[i] = a[i - 1] + mint(x).pow(i) * k;
		}
		set<int> se;
		for (int i = 0; i <= n; i++) se.insert(a[i].value);
		if (se.size() != n + 1) {
			cout << 0 << '\n';
			continue;
		}
		poly p = mul(0, n, a);
		p = p.differentiate();
		auto z = p.eval(a); assert(z.size() == n + 1);
		mint ans = 1;
		for (auto x: z) ans *= x;
		if (1LL * n * (n + 1) / 2 % 2 == 1) ans *= mod - 1;
		long long d = 0;
		for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) d += 1LL * i * (n - i + 1);
		ans /= mint(x).pow(d * 2);
		cout << ans << '\n';
	}
    assert(1 <= sum && sum <= 100000);
    return 0;
}

Please give me suggestions if anything is unclear so that I can improve. Thanks :slight_smile:

22 Likes

mind = blown.

12 Likes

Congratulations for the good tests capturing well the intended time complexity!

I believe that my solution below is \Theta(n. log^3(n)) and it gives TLE: https://www.codechef.com/viewsolution/35568252

Basically it is a straightforward divide-and-conquer solution for computing the product p(W_1, W_2, ..., W_n) = W_1.W_2...W_n.\prod_{i < j} (W_j - W_i), because:
p(W_1, W_2, ..., W_{n/2}, ..., W_n) = p(W_1, W_2, ..., W_{n/2}).p(W_{n/2 + 1}, ..., W_n).MultipointEvaluationOf( F(t) = (W_{n/2 + 1} - t)...(W_n - t) at points W_1, W_2, ..., W_{n/2})

A divide-and-conquer solution can compute that product F(t) = (W_{n/2 + 1} - t)...(W_n - t) as a polynomial of t in time \Theta(n.log^2(n)) since it steps on FFT/NTT internally.

Not sure about the time complexity of the multipoint polynomial evaluation, since I just copied over the code from the editorial of PPARTS from the last Long challenge; I assume it is not worse than \Theta(n.log^2(n)).

This all means that the original product, as per the recurrence above, is calculated for time \Theta(n.log^3(n))

Perhaps my constant is also a bit too large. This is my first ever serious attempt at an FFT problem, glad that at least theoretically it looks correct.

Totally missed the idea for the derivative.

6 Likes

My first solution is the same as yours, but the constant of FFT is too large :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

4 Likes

@loopfree not sure if you meant my sol, but anyways, you are my idol :slight_smile:
I just love how you smash super hard problems every time with ease …

2 Likes

Superb problem. Learnt a lot about FFT,NTT and fast multipoint evaluation. Found a paper on this here(Pg 13) and a CF blog

But even though my complexity is O(N*(logN)^2) it still gives TLE. The constant factors are huge I guess.
Can anyone tell me if some optimization is possible? My submission. My part of the code starts from line 344. I have added a few comments.

2 Likes

This solution is as good as it could be. I was thinking about the problem for 4 days, but couldn’t even come up with the use of pi.

2 Likes

Until the previous hint of differential i was fine,after that, damn, mind blown.
great question, first of this kind.
By the way this question was asked on math.stackexchange on March 4th but no replies.
Thanks for the nice editorial

3 Likes

Was stuck on the same boat of n*lg^3(n))

With the polynomial class in my code, maybe you can make the algorithm faster :sweat_smile:

2 Likes

I see. Well atleast I’m happy to know that the code I wrote was fine. I searched a lot for an NTT template and this was one of the best I could find.
Where did you find the polynomial class in your code or did you make it yourself?

The polynomial class is from a oier Entropy Increaser,it has 800+ line but it run fast.

What does it mean when time limit is 2.5sec. Like how many operations we can perform?

exactly, I mean my 15 pts solution was not even close to this.

1 Like

This time I did not submit any solutions but did the problems (because I am coming back to CP after many months). This was my favorite problem. My solution:
Step 1. We can take out a factor of X^{-\frac{n(n-1)(n-2)}{3}} from W^2 (so /6 from W) so that we can get the value of W as \prod_{l,r} (b_r - b_l) where b_i = (A_1*x + ... + A_i * x^i) (along with l's , we can also have l=0 with b_l = 0.)
Step 2. Consider a polynomial with its roots as b_i. Call it P(x). Note that W^2 is the same as the product of P'(x) evaluated at the roots, i.e. at 0,b_1,...,b_n.
Step 3. Now, create a segment-tree like structure where the leaves are the roots and each node has the polynomial which is the product of the two poly’s in its children. Note that by using FFT the whole tree is calculated in \mathcal O (N \log ^2 N), and the root is the polynomial. Now calculate the derivative of the polynomial, and call it Q(x).
Step 4 Now how can we evaluate Q at the N+1 roots in short time? Time to use the tree again. We can use polynomial division for this. Recall that Q(x) \% (x-a) = Q(a). So, using the polynomials we calculated on the tree, on each step we divide the polynomial at a node by the polynomial at its two children and store the remainder in them. Overall, the multi-evaluation step takes \mathcal O (N \log ^2 N).
Step 5. Now just multiply and get the answer!
Note: the derivative and multi point eval are explained here so people who did a bit of googling were sure helped. However, when I ran the code given in the github link there as-is to do this problem on my machine, on randomly generated testcases with the same constraints it took around 18 seconds. So I rewrote the important parts all over again and now it takes around 5 seconds. Still wont pass TL, but atleast mentally I can assume I solved the problem.
Edit: For those who used the cp-algo code as a copy pasta to solve this, note two things:

  1. The template<> business costs you some time, using simple (long long?) int with mod is slightly faster.
  2. If you use the readymade functions from there you’ll build the tree twice: once while evaluating P and once when doing the multi point eval. Instead use the same tree again for the multi point eval.
    Edit 2: The cp-algo code that I referred to is this. It defines a polynomial class and operations like interpolation etc.
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I don’t understand any of it still :sob:

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yes no matter what ever i did with polynomial, computation always resulted in (N ( N + 1)) / 2 operations.

A more tough problem would have been to calculate the product W(i, j) instead of its square…

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Same obstacle. According to the link 3(pg 21) for fast multipoint evaluation, the author’s code took 73 seconds for N = 2^20 ~ 10^6

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Yep. On my machine I got 18.63 seconds for randomly generated testcases with same N. However on inspecting the code above, I saw that the functions for poly_from_roots and multi_point_eval are not dependent on each other and build the tree again. Also, the code in the link is not optimizied per se. I rewrote the poly class with the specific required functions and got 5.8 seconds after a bit of optimization. Still nowhere near 2.5 though.

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